Good Talk by Mira Jacob

Has your child ever asked you difficult questions? the kind of questions that leave you fumbling, unexpectedly, for an answer? Jacob opens her book with just such a conversation between herself and her 6-year-old son.

If you have never read a graphic memoir before, there is no better place to start. Best for mature teens / adults. It would make a wonderful book group choice — especially for book groups looking for a way to deepen (or simply begin) conversations about racism and identity. Jacob looks unsparingly at the things that divide us and simultaneously offers us “the hope that hovers in our most difficult questions.”

Available as an eAudiobook here.

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